Tagged: antibiotic resistance

The Rise of the Resistance: How Antibiotics Work

In 1928, Alexander Fleming discovered penicillin, the first antibiotic discovered by mankind. He would eventually go on to win the Nobel Prize for this achievement, a well-deserved honor undoubtedly. The discovery itself is a bit of a humorous story, one of those moments in science that manifested as less of a “Eureka!” and more of “Hmmm, that’s interesting…” Regardless, the discovery would ultimately revolutionize the medical field and help usher us into the modern age of medicine. Although science history is fun to know, this post is not about where we’ve been; it’s about where we are now. We are...

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5 on Friday

“The science of today is the technology of tomorrow.” – Edward Teller 1. Advance In Human Embryo Research Rekindles Ethical Debate Scientists have recently discovered a new way of keeping human embryos alive in a laboratory. Normally when it came to human embryos, researchers were unable to keep them alive for anything longer than a week once removed from the womb. This has significantly hindered human embryonic research for decades. But now, researchers have extended the lifespan of embryos in the laboratory by another week, encompassing a critical point in the development of organs and tissues. This advancement is a...

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