Tagged: microbiome

Our picks in Science Policy April 9th-15th

Written by Ben Wolfson Originally published at https://wp.me/p8tLO8-2e 1. The problems with cancer research cell lines As a cancer biologists, there are several breast cancer cell lines I use every day. Some of these are derived from human tumors, some from mouse tumors that closely mimic what we see in human patients. However, we’ve known for a long time that cell lines don’t cut it in research. They’re good for the basics, but findings must be verified in an animal before it can even be attempted to be brought into the clinic. The NCI-60 was a panel of 60 human cancer...

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Let your kids play in the dirt, or don’t – they might be screwed either way.

The hygiene hypothesis has been a sexy but controversial topic in all the health sciences since its conception in the late 1980’s. The hypothesis being that developed countries have higher incidences of allergy because they are generally cleaner. Sounds simple but 20+ years later, it’s one of the most debated theories in the field. It started with an observation by David Strachan that, in a longitudinal study of individuals from birth to age 23, the incidence of hay fever was inversely correlated with the number of children in the household. In other words, the kids that got hay fever, which...

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