Tagged: Science policy

Our Picks in Science Policy April 16th-April 23rd

Written by Ben Wolfson Originally published at https://wp.me/p8tLO8-2j Of course, the big news this week was the Science March. With practically every news outlet hosting think-pieces and op-eds about the march, it seemed like other articles about science and science policy were pushed out of the public eye a bit. I’ll share a list of science march articles at the end, but for now here are a few of my favorite non-march related articles from the past week. 1. Diversity Problems in the March for Science Ok, one march related article. This is a great summary of the diversity problems that...

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Our picks in Science Policy April 9th-15th

Written by Ben Wolfson Originally published at https://wp.me/p8tLO8-2e 1. The problems with cancer research cell lines As a cancer biologists, there are several breast cancer cell lines I use every day. Some of these are derived from human tumors, some from mouse tumors that closely mimic what we see in human patients. However, we’ve known for a long time that cell lines don’t cut it in research. They’re good for the basics, but findings must be verified in an animal before it can even be attempted to be brought into the clinic. The NCI-60 was a panel of 60 human cancer...

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No Science Funding? Sad!

Authored by Benjamin Wolfson President Trump recently released his first budget proposal, which would go into effect in 2018. This budget proposal contains major funding cuts to science, significantly increasing military funding while drastically cutting the budgets of the Environmental Protection Agency, National Institute of Health, Department of Energy, and numerous other scientific agencies. While the outcry against these cuts from the scientific community has been unanimous, it’s easy to forget the specific reasons why cutting science funding is such a bad idea. Typically, when we talk about the benefits of research, we discuss them in terms of the material benefits that are received (better medicine, computers, etc.) or...

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The 21st Century Cures Act may help solve many problems, but ignores others

Authors (alphabetical): Gregory Conway, Eric Lumsden, Spencer Todd & Benjamin Wolfson I. Introduction One of the biggest challenges facing the scientific community is in the field of biomedical research and development. At a recent symposium discussing translating research into effective treatments, the idea of an ‘Innovation Gap’ was introduced. Companies continue to increase the amount of money spent to develop drugs but production has remained at a consistent level (Figure 1). It is becoming more expensive to develop drugs, and companies are becoming reluctant to take on that challenge. This has a downstream effect, where companies will only research and...

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